Tag Archives: Acholer

Thatch Roofed Houses

The smallest things can sometimes have the biggest impact on a person. I feel as though this is especially true here in Uganda. For me, there is no more poignant example of this than the thatch-roofed houses that cover every free inch of space not taken up by farmland in rural Uganda.

The thatch-roofed houses of rural Uganda are little more than mud huts covered by thick roofs of dried elephant grass. There is very little to these homes and almost nothing that differentiates one of them from the many others that dot the countryside. The floors of these homes are dirt and there are hardly any pieces of furniture or other interior decorations inside. To me, as a person used to the comforts of the new world it is absolutely insane that anyone person would be able live inside of those huts

After visiting a Jesuit school in Ocer County, Gulu, I had the opportunity to visit a family who was living inside a settlement of these thatched-roof opinions. Contrary to popular opinion amonst our group, the family of Roger Ocan who were living inside of this thatched-roofed hoisin complex was incredibly joyful and more than happy to share our home with us. They spoke of the traditional and emotional impact of the thatched-roof houses in their Achlor culture. This experience completely changed my negative viewpoint of the thatched-roof houses. Instead of being just meager abodes, these houses have a cultural significance that adds to the rich beauty of Uganda. Now, when I see a thatched-roof house, I cannot help but smile and think of the beautiful cultural connection that they have to the Achlor