Tag Archives: film

The Realization of Complication

Complicate.

It’s a word that we learned on our very first day in Nogales. One of the Kino Border Initiative’s main goals is for groups to leave with an understanding of the complicated reality of migration. After two weeks on the border, I can’t imagine anyone leaving without complication packed in his or her baggage.

I thought I learned complication from the desert walk, our discussions with people who work on the border, Operation Streamline or the migrant’s stories, but I didn’t understand it until I got back home.

When my family asked what I learned, my mind went blank. I felt like every question, every frustration, every sign of hope was at the tip of my tongue but couldn’t escape; I had so much to say, but no way to say it.

That frustrating feeling was when I truly understood the layers of complication that migration carries. I always knew the layers were there and I uncovered even more during the trip, but to know and to understand are not the same thing.

I think this is part of Kino’s magic; they taught us as much as they could, but left the understanding for a later date.

Now that I truly understand, I am so thankful for the outlet of film.

Even though I often find myself frustrated and overwhelmed with migration’s level of complexity; knowing that there will be an epic film full of b-roll and sick edits, gives me relief.

Credit to CU Backpack
Credit to CU Backpack

More to come,

Natalie

Storytellers

Now that we’re back in Omaha, it’s back to Hitchcock 205 to get down to business. Half of the class has been working on the story line and the other half has been sifting through the copious amounts of videos that were taken.

The past few days I have been very busy. I’ve been filing through all of the B-roll that we filmed in order to piece different scenes together (B-roll is alternative footage that is weaved along with the main shot.) It’s like going on a scavenger hunt to find the perfect pieces and then creating your own puzzle or getting to write your own story. I’ve really loved being able to create different scenes and watching the stories come to life. I feel like a storyteller, and I love it.

Editing that B-roll, listening to Views by Drake.
Editing that B-roll, jamming to Views by Drake, sipping’ on that basic liquid and loving life.

When I was younger, I was interested in directing and editing film. However at the time, I had an amateur digital camera that I got from Santa (I planned on proving that Santa wasn’t real the next year by placing my camera strategically on the fireplace and letting it film the whole night) and the old Windows Movie Maker. I apologize to my friends who i drafted for my horrendous, amateur movies.

As I grew older, I didn’t have as much time for videos and lost touch with one of my favorite things as a child. I’ve felt nostalgic over the past few days. I’ve been asking Nico to review the scenes I’ve been editing. I’m determined to pick his brain and ask constantly for constructive criticism. My goal is to become a master of Final Cut Pro, just as Nico is. Who knows, maybe I’ll want to do this for awhile.

A Pilgrimage of Our Own

I have never been on a pilgrimage.

I’ve always imagined what it would look like. Long travel days. Poor hygiene. An air of excitement. I can happily say that I was almost right. Our group’s hygiene is on fleek.

Over the last two days we have traveled over 1,400 miles in a total of 24 hours of driving. There has been sleeping, singing, sight-seeing and more sleeping. Our already fun group grew even closer; I guess two vans full of antsy students is to blame.

Even though we were driving to the border, we didn’t discuss it or our mission much. The vibe of the van changed when we approached the outskirts of the city. The beautiful desert scenery was obstructed with border control and a giant drone searching for immigrants in the mountains. It was surreal. I felt like I was in a movie rather than my own country. We played inspirational music and remained silent until we approached our home for the next two weeks. Those final moments in the car set the mood for our mission.

Here is a quote that I have kept with me in travels throughout Europe a that I see fit for this journey:

“A pilgrimage is not a vacation; it is a transformational journey during which significant change takes place. New insights are given. Deeper understanding is attained. New and old places in the heart are visited. Blessings are received and healing takes place. On return from the pilgrimage, life is seen with different eyes. Nothing will ever be quite the same again,” Macrina Wiederkehr.

 

 

Here is our group after we arrived in AZ.

Tomorrow we are entering Mexico, filming B roll and interviewing an employee of the Kino Border Initiative.

For now, I’m exhausted.

More to come,
Natalie

Nothing.

“So, what did you learn at school today?”

“Nothing.”

While this conversation was common in my house, I don’t think I would pass Carol’s class with a one word blog post. Not only would it be taking cutting copy to the next level, but it would be a total and complete lie.

So, what did I learn in school today? Or, the last three days I should say.

I’ve learned about shutter speeds, asking open-ended questions, ecclesiology, the rule of thirds, Pulitzer Prize winners, paradigm shifts, boom mics, content management systems, Vatican II, Nico’s sad face, Snickerdoodle recipes, John’s hair history…

These are only a few topics that have been covered throughout the last several days of backpack bootcamp. I could dedicate a blog post to each, but I would lose readers and probably some friends.

So, what have I really learned? That I can do this.

I can shoot video, edit it, and understand that it takes more than a filter to look good.

I can reference brilliant work and use that inspiration to formulate questions, anticipate answers and tastefully seek the truth.

I can educate others on the connection between my faith and an active social justice issue.

Finally, I learned that I have the best group to learn right along with me.

Thanks for the photo, Aly.
Thanks for the photo, Aly.

 

I used to say nothing, now I have everything.

Arizona awaits.

More to come,

Natalie